13 Apr 2020

BY: Online Therapy

Clinical Psychologist / Clinical Psychology / In-office counselling / Online Clinical Psychologist / Online therapist / Online Therapy

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Jim Bierman, the latest addition to our Online Clinical Psychologist team

We are pleased to introduce Jim Bierman, the latest addition to our Online Clinical Psychologist team. Jim is an independent licensed clinical psychologist (Registered with the New Zealand Psychologist Board) joining our group of therapists. Below is my interview with Jim, so you can get to know him better.

How did you get into Clinical Psychology?

By a circuitous path which, for psychology, gave me life experience that forever informs me of my patients’ condition, perception, and suffering. Originally a biologist, my time in the field made clear to me that the success of all endeavours depends on the relationships within the team.  Relationships are the key. There is no other field or profession that allows you to understand relationships and confront dysfunction than in psychology. In practising psychology, I never take for granted the privilege and permission my patients grant me to intervene in this most personal part of their lives.

Where did you do your training and how did you register at the New Zealand Psychologist board?

California Graduate Institute in Los Angeles, where I studied clinical psychology with an emphasis in psychoanalysis. Then the University of Washington School of Medicine, Parent Evaluation Training Program, where I trained in report writing in Family Court for High Conflict child custody cases. I registered in NZ seven years ago when I took a position in the Southern District DHB, children’s outpatient clinic.


What work did you do in NZ but also internationally?

20+ years in community mental health, 25 years in private practice.  Primarily outpatient but also 3 years supervising an inpatient unit.


What key functions will you bring to Online Therapy?

To listen, reflect, interpret, and further the best interest of my patient.


Why were you brought on board and what is your specialist areas?

Starting with psychoanalysis and primitive mental states, I work with individuals across the age range, couples at all stages of their relationship (see my book, ‘Of Sound Mind to Marry’, and families.  I am located in Auckland, New Zealand and am available to face to face sessions, government lockdown permitting.


What do you enjoy doing in your spare time?

Tai Chi Chuan, yoga, hiking, music, appreciating the beautiful place we live in.

To contact Jim Bierman, the latest addition to our Online Clinical Psychologist team, feel free to complete the form below.

12 Apr 2020

BY: Online Therapy

Clinical Psychologist / Clinical Psychology / Cognitive Behaviour Therapy / Online CBT / Online Clinical Psychologist / Online Cognitive Behaviour Therapy / Online therapist / Online Therapy

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Why Online Clinical Psychologists Using Cognitive Behaviour Therapy are Incredibly Effective

Photo by Gustavo Fring from Pexels and article by Kimberly Yusay

Are you looking to try out online Cognitive Behavioural Therapy?

If you’re unsure and need some facts to help you, we have compiled 3 reasons why online CBT might just be what you need to get your life back on track.

1.    Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is Heavily Backed by Science.

The American Psychological Association indicates that compared to other forms of therapy, there is abundant scientific evidence that backs up the effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT).

Because of this, it is different and even considered more effective than other therapies.

It also treats a vast array of mental illness that includes:

  • Anxiety disorders,
  • Eating disorders
  • Depression,
  • Alcohol and drug misuse,
  • Marital problems,

As stated by UK’s National Health Services it can also provide help people suffering from:

  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Phobias
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
  • Panic Disorder
  • Schizophrenia,
  • Borderline Personality Disorder
  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Sleep Problems
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

NHS UK also emphasized that CBT helps you sort through the interplay of your emotions, bodily sensations and behaviours.

It allows you to break through from the cycle of repeated actions, negative thought patterns and unhealthy coping mechanisms.

2.    Online CBT is a Proven Beneficial Treatment.

According to a 2011 study, Online Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is a useful alternative to face-to-face CBT sessions.

In fact, this research which began in 1996, became the basis for the Dutch government. And, since 2005, the costs of online CBT were refunded through their country’s public health insurance.

3.    Online CBT Psychologists Have a Lasting Effect on Wellbeing

In a 2016 article published in the Internet Interventions journal, a total of 42 patients shared how the behaviours of their online clinical psychologists contributed to the improvement of their wellbeing.

  • Affirmation – This particular behaviour of online psychologists helped the patients long after the treatment was over. Its positive effect on depressive symptoms was shown to last even after two years.
  • Encouragement–  The effects of this can be seen right away. It emerged right after the patients have undergone the session/s.
  • Self-disclosure – Similar to affirmation, patients who were able to share their untold stories and vulnerabilities showed vast improvements in depressive symptoms even after some time has passed after the treatment.

Want to get in touch with a Clinical Psychologist who can help you with CBT? Contact below.

23 Mar 2020

BY: Online Therapy

Covid-19 / Online therapist / Online Therapy / Online therapy for Coronavirus

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Where to get Coronavirus Assistance

Are you affected by the Coronavirus?

As New Zealand joins the rest of the world by going into alert levels 3 and 4, many people experience tremendous stress at the thought of losing livelihoods. Remember, you are not alone. Most people are employed by small businesses, and many individuals have the same fears as you. The world is in this together.

Anna offered free online appointments. However, due to high demand, she is unable to accept more new clients. She will continue with the appointments she currently has. We have listed a number of emergency numbers you may need during this time.

Emergency numbers:

Lifeline: 09-522 2999 - text help (4357)
Suicide Crisis Helpline 0508 828 865
Anxiety NZ: 09-522 2999
Depression.org: 0800 111 757
LGBTIQ – Outline:  0800 688 5463
Woman’s refuge: 0800 733 843
Youthline 0800 376 633 (text 234 email talk@youthline.co.nz)
Barnardos NZ 0800 WHAT’S UP (0800 942 8787)
Family services https://www.familyservices.govt.nz/directory/searchresultspublic.htm?searchTerms=&cat1=-1&searchRegion=2&search=Search
Minds and hearts support directory: http://heartsandminds.org.nz/information-support/support-services-directory

Extreme emergencies:

First point of contact 111
Mental Health Crisis Team 0800 800 717.

For Online Counselling Sessions ($150 per session), please contact Sara:

References:

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12318941

05 Sep 2019

BY: Online Therapy

Acceptance Commitment Therapy / Happiness / Online therapist / Online Therapy / Positive Psychology / Telephone Counselling

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Positive Psychology – choose happiness

Article by Sara Taveira. Sara uses telephone counselling or Zoom counselling to help you work through your difficulties. Would you like to learn more about Sara? Then follow this link. 

Positive psychology – choose happiness

We all want to find happiness, to smile and feel good about ourselves and our lives. This pursuit of happiness is intrinsic to human nature. Several self-report studies reveal that people rated happiness as more important than having meaning in life and being financially comfortable.

It would be great to experience lots of happy moments all the time. However, the belief in a constant state of happiness is not true. Happiness can be hard work and usually implies accepting a new way of reacting to discomforts. Being happy involves being in the moment, here and now, which entails a state of mind, and not a continuous feeling.

Read More “Positive Psychology – choose happiness”

20 Jul 2019

BY: Online Therapy

Introversion / Online therapist / Online Therapy / Shyness / Social phobia / Telephone Counselling

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Telephone Counselling working with introversion, social phobia and shyness

This article, Telephone Counselling working with introversion, social phobia and shyness was written by Sara Taveira.

Am I introverted, socially phobic or just shy?

This article deals with telephone counselling working with introversion, social phobia and shyness. These concepts are often interpreted as semantics and can lead to confusion.

Generally, social phobia, shyness and introversion are viewed in the same light. In this article, I will explain the difference between each concept and what they have in common.

Introversion

Introversion is a personality trait. Introverted people have a higher interest in their own internal world, their thoughts and feelings, and are usually happy to spend time alone. Actually, most introverts need alone time as a self-care tool as much as extroverts need social time to recharge their batteries.

Social Phobia

In contrast, social phobia is a mental health disorder based on a perceived irrational and exaggerated fear in social situations. A person suffering from social phobia is usually interested in social situations. However, their fears of being judged by others or embarrassing themselves lead them to avoid social interactions and facing them with significant distress.

People experiencing social phobia, are usually overly conscious people, perfectionist, and have constant feelings of being “put on the spot” in social interactions. This distress impacts several areas of their lives. It is not hard to imagine that someone struggling with social phobia will have extreme difficulties initiating and/or maintaining relationships, which contribute to social isolated.

Being isolated socially can lead to other mood disorders and may affect future goals. How? Well, think about choosing a university degree or a professional career pathway. If I am social phobic, will I choose a career involving primarily social interactions like public relations, politics, management, etc.? Probably not. Social phobia can vary in intensity and forms: some people only struggle with social situations (being the focus of attention) – performance type – while others will struggle simply with social interaction in groups. Severe forms of social phobia may have both forms present.

Children’s experiences of social phobia

Children’s presentation of social phobia may vary according to their different developmental stages. Due to developmentally appropriate diminished self-awareness, young children usually can only describe several physical symptoms, are extremely clingy in social situations, refuse to participate in social or school activities and do not tend to speak when meeting new people.

Middle school-age children, as they become more self-aware, can say things like “I expect bad things to happen” or “others are looking at me while I am eating” or “others are saying bad things about me”.

Teenagers experiencing social phobia, are usually very hard on themselves and self-critic, thus, will often avoid eye contact, or struggle at an academic level (which can lead to school truancy). They can have difficulty dating and in some cases start at-risk type of behaviours, such as alcohol and drugs experimentation as a coping mechanism for their anxiety.

Shyness

Shyness includes a number of uncomfortable feelings such as awkwardness, stress and worry when interacting with unfamiliar people. Shyness can be present when someone experiences introversion and social phobia.

Since I am a food lover, let me explain it this way: Introversion and social phobia are the two bread slices of a sandwich and shyness can be considered the cheese that connects the slices. Shyness often, but not always, leads to social phobia. Similarly, an introvert may be shy when facing unfamiliar social situations but it does not necessarily mean that he/she suffers from social phobia.

Conclusion

Telephone Counselling working with introversion, social phobia and shyness is possible. Whether you are an adult with a constant feeling of being “put on the spot”, or have a child who displays some of the above symptoms, the more you avoid it, the worse it gets!

Start today by taking the driver’s seat when it comes to your social phobia so that you can learn to park it somewhere and never look back! Talk to us, we can join you in these driving lessons.

Want to learn more about telephone Counselling working with introversion, social phobia and shyness? Feel free to contact Sara. Want to learn more about Sara, follow this link.

Contact Sara Now

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05 Jun 2019

BY: Online Therapy

Clinical Psychology / Depression / Online Depression Counselling / Online therapist / Online Therapy / Seasonal Depression

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Seasonal Depression

Article by Sara Taveira

WINTER IS COMING

Experiencing the Winter Blues (Seasonal Depression)?

What is seasonal depression? We are all familiar with this heading tagline from a famous TV Series. However, the expression is also highly used these days because of the difficulties of “surviving” through the winter, the so-called, winter blues. On a daily basis, we can already notice the slight changes in mood in everyone’s faces, the sense that people are already building up their emotions around the fact that the cold, dark and rainy days are ahead of us.

Why do we feel seasonal depression?

Well, although science has not come up with a specific answer yet, it mentions several contributing factors contributing.

  • Vitamin D: “you are my sunshine, my only sunshine”, indeed! This vitamin is very important to our energy levels and mood as it helps with cell growth, our immune system and many other things in our body. During the winter period, most of us wake up when there is no daylight, go to work, spend all day in the office and then, when it’s time to return home, the daylight is already gone. As a result, we do not have much of this vitamin in the winter when comparing to spring and summer time.
  • Hibernation: this may sound strange but some research talks about a physical slow down process that all mammals go through, during winter. Humans are no exception, although in a lighter way. The problem with this is that we actually cannot hibernate and have to keep going with our busy lives.
  • The relation between body hormones, light, and circadian rhythm: these three dances harmoniously. In detail, daylight differences regulate our internal biological clock through the release of hormones, such as melatonin. Therefore, at night, because daylight ends, our body starts producing this hormone which makes us feel sleepy, decreases our body temperature, and many other modifications to tell us “it is bedtime”. The opposite process occurs every morning. So, if you consider all this, you will find the answer to the common question “why am I still so sleepy and tired every morning?”. That is right, in winter when you wake up, there is no daylight, so melatonin is still running happily through your veins, so you feel very sleepy. The lack of light also decreases another hormone, which is extremely important for mood, appetite, sleep, social behaviour and even sexual appetite regulation – serotonin. So, it makes sense that you feel less happy during dark, cold and rainy days, as our natural mood stabilizer is much less produced by our brain.

What can we do beat Seasonal Depression?

Well, I guess just like olive oil, garlic and onions are the basis of any good recipe, so exercise, diet, and sleep are the basis not only for avoiding the winter blues but for good mental health. For this reason, eat smart by avoiding sugar, alcohol, and caffeine, which can deteriorate your mood, and nourish yourself with chocolate once in a while as it helps to boost your mood. Aim for 8 hours of sleep, and get moving by simply going outside and doing a 30 minutes’ walk. You will kill two birds with one stone: you will exercise and get some natural daylight. Other ideas that may help are expressing your emotions and being near your social support for those harder moments, turning on the radio or other music you like at home to glow the dark rainy days or learn a new skill/new project. If your wallet is “booming”, plan a trip to a sunny place.

What if the above ideas are not enough?

It might come as a surprise to you, but there is in fact a mental health disorder caused by the above alterations in our body, a seasonal depression. Some examples of symptoms are sadness and loneliness, social withdrawn, excessive tiredness, irritability, etc. These symptoms have to cause clinically significant distress and/or impairment in important areas of your overall functioning.

So please talk to us if you are worried you might be experiencing seasonal depression. We can assess if you are, and if so, help you to overcome them.

Want to know more about Sara? Follow this link.

Contact Sara Now

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06 Apr 2019

BY: Online Therapy

Clinical Psychologist / Clinical Psychology / Online Clinical Psychologist / Online therapist / Online Therapy / Online Therapy Clinical Psychologist

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Online Therapy welcomes Sara Taveira Clinical Psychologist

Online Therapy welcomes Sara Taveira Clinical Psychologist to our online family

Sara Taveira interviewed by Anna Keyter:

We are delighted to introduce Sara Taveira to our Online Therapy family,  and this is her story.  Sara is an independent clinical psychologist (Registered with the New Zealand Psychologist Board) joining our small group of therapists. Below is the interview with Sara to get to know her better.

How did you get into Clinical Psychology?

I started my University Degree initially wanting to become a forensic psychologist.  My dream was to be a “Criminal Profiler”. However, in the first years, I was introduced to the multitude of psychology fields and it was with clinical psychology that I connected the most.

I love life, people, smiles, a good laugh and positivity. Possibly, these are the things that motivated me to become a psychologist in the first place. That visceral curiosity about the other, the need to understand the person I am in a therapeutic relationship with, and help them if I can. With clinical psychology and psychotherapy, I can certainly do that.

Where did you do your training and how did you register at the New Zealand Psychologist board?

I completed my studies up to Masters level and psychologist certification in Lisbon, Portugal. In the European Union, the higher education is based on the “Bologna Process”, which in cooperation with all European countries, standardises higher education among all countries, thus strengthening quality assurance and facilitating the recognition of qualifications and periods of study. Therefore, the process to register at the New Zealand Psychologist Board (NZPB) was straightforward as they follow the guidelines from the UK as part of the Commonwealth of Nations.

What work did you do in New Zealand and internationally?

When I moved to New Zealand I started working for the District Health Board’s (DHB).  I attended to patients experiencing moderate to severe mental health disorders. I have worked in many different Hospital Services: Maternal Mental health; Children, adolescents and families services; Eating disorders Specialized Services; Parental intervention and group therapy for children with behavioural disorders Specialized Services and Mental Health Crisis Team.

I accepted a contract as a psychologist and psychotherapist with the ACC in 2015.  At the ACC, I provided services for Sensitive Claims, doing psychological assessments to determine mental injury from sexual abuse trauma.

In Portugal, I started my career as a university counsellor and providing psychological assessment services as a student. After completing my qualification, I gained experience in psychiatric hospitals, schools, private practice and psychosocial projects for children and adolescents with risk-taking behaviours, their families and the school community as a clinical psychologist.

What key functions will you bring to Online Therapy?

As a clinical psychologist, I am hoping to bring a new intervention approach – psychotherapy – to those who are not able to attend on-site consultations.  If you are unable to get to an office, you can contact me online.  The online space is where I can offer assistance for people physical problems and disability, illness, mobility, geographic area, language, difficulty in reconciling schedules and unable to get to an office.

Psychotherapy addresses overall patterns, including chronic or recurring problems in a person’s life, and focuses on feelings and experience. It is an in-depth therapy modality on internal thoughts and feelings and core issues. The main objective is to achieve personal growth and to gain insight into the main areas of a person’s life.

During my 12 years of experience, I have gained qualifications in different specific psychotherapy modalities which could benefit Online Therapy clients.  These qualifications include EMDR, CBT, Mindfulness, ACT, CRT, CBT-E and FBT, evidence-based protocols for PTSD and complex trauma.

I consider myself an eclectic psychologist, focused on adapting the intervention to each person. I don’t follow the trend of labelling with diagnostics and jargon but aim to understand each unique person I am working with, and then adapt working tools accordingly. Over the years of clinical practice, I have found that working with emotions is central to all processes when dealing with transformation and personal growth, which is the focal point in my therapy room.

Why were you brought on board and what is your specialist areas?

I have started my relationship with Online Therapy over a year ago, fuelled by my interest in telepsychology and helping patients who cannot attend face to face therapy.  I am also keen to maintain my bilingual psychotherapy skills. As an eclectic psychologist, I have gained experience and interest over the years in conditions such as anxiety and stress, depression, eating disorders, trauma, relationships, feelings of emptiness, emotional difficulties, life changes adaptation difficulties, parental coaching and personal growth/coaching.

What do you enjoy doing in your spare time?

I will start by saying that I may share DNA with cats since I love sunbathing. Food is another great passion as, in my culture, it means family reunion and connection. I get immense bliss when cooking for loved ones and putting smiles on their faces.

Motherhood has been, without a doubt, the joy of all joys and a highway to happy moments, personal growth and constant self-reflection.

Music provides the background soundtrack to my life. It allows me to personify emotions, it helps me to express myself and enables me to relate to others as well. My most recent personal goal is to learn how to play the guitar so that I can sing and play with my child.

A good conversation undeniably makes my day and time fly.  What else… well, I am a woman, a mother, a daughter, a sister, a wife, a friend, a colleague, a neighbour, a society member, a citizen of the world….

 

 

Contact Sara Now

12 Nov 2018

BY: Online Therapy

Acceptance Commitment Therapy / Acceptance Commitment Training (ACT) / Anxiety / Group Therapy / Online ACT / Online therapist / Online Therapy / Workplace stress / Workshop

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Group Therapy using Acceptance Commitment Training ACT

Group Therapy using Acceptance Commitment Training ACT:

Good news!  Online Therapy will be offering group counselling programmes starting next year (2019) mid-January.  To learn more about our previous workshops, please follow this link.  We have prepared a course that focuses on Acceptance Commitment Training (ACT) which works well with workplace stress and anxiety. The year kicks off with training programs that can provide you with tools to make a positive change to your work environment and family life.

We love group work because it offers members feedback to help recognise personal problems from different perspectives. Within the therapeutic context, it is comforting to hear that you are not alone and that many people have similar ways of processing thoughts.  It is also reassuring to know that group therapy using acceptance and commitment training ACT has a proven track record to address stress and anxiety effectively.

You may ask: Why choose Group Therapy using acceptance and commitment training ACT?

ACT is based on six core processes, acceptance, cognitive defusion, present moment, self-as-context, values and committed actions as discussed below.  During group work, you will learn how to work through these processes and create goals based on their values and then taking committed action.  Below is a summary of the ACT core processes.

Acceptance and Commitment Training or (ACT) six core processes:
Acceptance:

During group work, you will be provided with tools to learn how to accept difficult emotions instead of fighting them.

Cognitive Defusion:

You will learn to change the way you interact with difficult thoughts by creating distance from emotions that are not useful.  In that way, negative thoughts have less power over you.

Being Present:

By learning to be present you are more flexible in your actions and you can start to set goals, based on what is important to you (values). This happens by changing your internal language.  Your new behaviour will be based on your describing events in a non-judgemental way.  Hence, you become “self-as-process” and learn to defuse from ongoing, unhelpful thoughts and feelings.

Self-as-Context:

Due to relational frames (I vs You, Now vs Then, and Here vs There), language shapes our perspective of the world.  Being self-as-context you become aware of how you identify with past and future thoughts.  During group therapy, you will learn techniques to help you become aware of your ‘flow of experiences’ and learn how to detach from unhelpful feelings.  Even with shortcomings we can accept ourselves and live meaningful lives.

Values: 

The group will set goals according to their values.

Committed Action: 

You will be encouraged to take action linked to their values to achieve goals.  After each session, you will receive homework to help you action your goals.

If you would like to learn more about Group Therapy using Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT), then feel free to contact me using the form below.

Contact Us

To receive more information on Group Therapy using Acceptance Commitment Training ACT, please feel free to subscribe to our newsletter.

References

Mostafa Heydari, Saideh Masafi, Mehdi Jafari,Seyed Hassan Saadat, and Shima Shahyad (2018), Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Anxiety and Depression of Razi Psychiatric Center Staff

31 Oct 2018

BY: Online Therapy

Couple Counselling / Couples Counselling / Marriage Counselling / Online Skype Counselling / Online therapist / Online Therapy / Relationship Counselling / Video Counselling

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Relationship Counselling Auckland using Video Calling

Photo by J Carter.

Relationship Counselling Auckland using Video Calling:

This article, Relationship Counselling Auckland using Video Calling builds on an essay that discusses attachment theory within relationship counselling. Today’s article Relationship Counselling Auckland using Video Calling focuses on the separation-individuation theory (when children learn to separate from parents emotionally) and considers how the family system can cause family members to attain/not-attain personal authority and how it affects relationships.

Relationship counselling involves an exploration of attachment styles and looks at how people develop relationship communication patterns from childhood into adulthood. For example, have you ever wondered why you and your siblings remember events differently?

People experience circumstances within their contexts which influence how they make sense of themselves and their worlds.  The primary consideration in the separation-individuation process is the smooth transition from one stage to the next. Conversely, disruptions or restrictions during the transition process can have life-long effects in the way we respond to our worlds.

The mother is involved in her child’s changes from dependence, individuation to differentiation (discussed below).  At first the child is entirely dependent on the mother, but eventually, he/she struggles for control to achieve autonomy.  At times, parents are uncomfortable with the child finding his/her individuality, and a power struggle may ensue.   Early experiences affect the way people make sense of themselves over a lifetime and influence how they react in relationships.

Dependence

As discussed in Relationship counselling using Skype, attachment styles develop within the first years (zero to three years) when mother and baby are undifferentiated. In other words, the baby can’t discriminate between I / Not-I and believes mother/baby are one (Mahler, 1986). Furthermore, the mother experiences the baby as an extension of herself. Keep in mind, attachment theory is not developmental and is understood as universal individual experiences that form the basis of family dynamics (Blom & Bergman, 2013).

Individuation

From three years onwards, children start developing their own identities.  Failure to individuate means a person cannot create a sense of self and continues to experience the self in the context of the family.  Individuating too early can lead to coping styles where a person relies on self too much, but prolonged dependence can lead to overdependence in adult life.

A teenager generally individuates around the age of 16 by moving more towards their social circles and developing their own identities outside their family units.  At this stage, the young person is still very much part of the family.  Successful individuation is experienced when parents encourage teenagers to follow dreams, encourage open debate and let go (in a healthy way) of their children at the appropriate time.

Differentiation

Successful differentiation means that the young adult (generally by 35) is fully aware of I / Not-I and can function successfully independent of the parent or marriage partner.  However, I have found in therapy that some couples become fused and start viewing the other as an extension of themselves. This can place tremendous pressure on the relationship.  Once the partners accept that they can function independently within a unit, then the relationship can improve.

Can Relationship Counselling using Video Calling be effectively used with attachment problems?

Absolutely, not only can it be effective, but also convenient when avoiding traffic.  However, not all people are comfortable with the electronic medium and prefer face-to-face counselling.

Below please find the references for the article Relationship Counselling Auckland using Video Calling

Inga Blom and Anni Bergman: Observing Development: A Comparative View of Attachment Theory and Separation–Individuation Theory

Mahler, M. S. (1986b). On the first three subphases of the separation-individuation process. In P. Buckley (Ed.), Essential papers on object relations (pp. 222–232). New York: New York University Press.

Feel free to contact us if you need relationship counselling by completing the Contact us form.

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30 Jul 2018

BY: Online Therapy

Online Counselling / Online Counsellor / Online Skype Counselling / Online therapist / Online Therapy / Skype Counselling

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Online Skype Counselling

Online Skype Counselling:

Not all medical healthcare schemes accept Online Skype Counselling. However, the American Medical Association allows reimbursements for Skype or online consultations.  The American Psychological Association (APA) labels Online Skype Counselling Telepsychology. Skype counselling is no longer considered to be the future of psychological services; it has become part of daily mental health care.  As a result, Skype counsellors living in the 21st century are evolving with the times and are starting to include online counselling as part of their practice. Technology is playing an essential role in interdisciplinary health care including mental health.  As with face to face mental health practice, it is up to the individual professional to provide a satisfactory service by following the relevant professional code of conduct.

Online Skype Counselling Quality

But what constitutes good quality mental health care on the Skype platform?  Skype or video counselling may be an excellent outlet for individuals who have agoraphobia, social phobia or shyness.  Some may argue that Skype counselling could reinforce such behaviour. However, the most critical part of the counselling process is the therapeutic alliance which can be established during Skype counselling by a trained professional.  Furthermore, Skype counselling provides a platform for those who would otherwise not have access to mental health services.

Goals of Online Skype Counselling

When considering the future of the Online Skype Counsellor, Lehoux, Battista and Lance (2000) suggest that the focus should not only be on technology but also sociopolitics.  For this reason, they provided a framework for analysis using constructs such as actors (professionals, clients, families, manufacturers, third parties and administrators), the flow of resources (funding and reimbursement strategies), knowledge (who makes the rules?), and power (who controls it?).  On the practical level, Lehoux, Battista and Lance (2000) recommend that online counselling meet four primary goals for the service to be useful:

  1. Reduction in transportation for client and providers
  2. Reaching underserved populations
  3. Understanding client and service provider
  4. Countering rural isolation
Our Practice

While many studies reveal that face to face counselling is still the prefered method of intervention, the clients of Online Therapy prefer Skype or Video counselling.  As a result, the Online Therapy practice is contacted almost exclusively for Skype Counselling services.  The main reasons stated for the preference is the convenience and affordability.

Want to learn more?  Feel free to email info@onlinetherapy.co.nz or give us a call +(64) 9 888 0779.

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