23 Apr 2018

BY: Anna Keyter

Assessment / Counselling / Ethics / Treaty of Waitangi

Comments: No Comments

Counselling | Treaty of Waitangi

Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the importance in counselling:

It is essential to understand Māori health and wellbeing and Te Tiriti o Waitangi as it relates to mental health in order to address cultural issues in practice. The treaty was a negotiation between Māori and the Crown to establish New Zealand as a British colony. In modern society, this partnership extends to developing health strategies for Māori to obtain proper health services. This also extends to the protection of Māori cultural concepts and values. Māori communities are encouraged to engage in the planning and development of health strategies that would have an impact on them.

Counselling | Treaty of Waitangi

A counsellor in New Zealand should take into account cultural aspects such as physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual. Furthermore, therapists need to acknowledge cultural identity when working with Māori communities. Supporting Māori on an emotional level includes a commitment to their identity and counsellors should use approaches that would assist Māori to re-connect with their communities after interventions due to the importance they place on whanau (related and extended families).

Treaty of Waitangi Framework includes but is not limited to:
  • Te Reo Māori: Using Te Reo Māori to show respect, holding onto identity and being guardians of Māori Culture.
  • Tuakiri Tangata: Acknowledges Māori persona, personality and identity. Here we consider principles such as cultural aspects but also physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual.
  • Tikanga Māori: Involves previous generations and how to live by Māori values. Tikanga comprises values from previous generations but also taking generational advancement into account. Māori expresses underlying principles differently even though the roots remain the same.
  • Whakawhanaunga: There are different interpretations of whānau, that being said, a general meaning assigned to it is family members who share common descent. As a counsellor, it is important to understand the different roles whānau occupy and the responsibilities assigned to each role.
  • Hauora Māori: Perspectives on health and wellbeing. The models and frameworks that underpin Maori health and wellbeing is an inclusive and holistic worldview. What makes these models unique is the relationship Māori have to the land and the link to whakapapa/genealogy.
  • Manaaki: It is required that Māori behave in ways that enhance the mana of others, i.e. be honouring people, providing service, respect and generosity. This highlights the importance of positive service and is specifically relevant to the mental health and addictions contexts.
Conclusion

Counsellors should pay particular attention to multiculturalism and the effect it has on relationships. Culture is more than race and ethnicity, it also includes gender, age ideology, socioeconomic status, religion, sexual orientation, occupation and lifestyle issues. Members of cultural groups may also differ from their group’s description. When working from a cultural framework, it is important to consider enculturation (retaining indigenous culture) and acculturation (adapting to dominant culture). The counsellor should recognise which helping skill is more effective for clients within their cultural framework (Hill, 2014).

Need to know more?  Call us +(64) 9 888 0779  or complete the contact form.
References

Pua Wanaanga course

Hill, C. E. (2014). Helping skills: Facilitating exploration, insight, and action (4th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Contact us today

19 Apr 2018

BY: Anna Keyter

Assessment / Counselling / Couple Counselling / Online Counselling / Online Counsellor / Online therapist / Online Therapy / Treatment

Comments: No Comments

Therapeutic Relationship Online Therapist
Factors that promote or hinder the therapeutic relationship | Online Therapist:

There are endless factors that could affect the therapeutic relationship. Hill (2014) stresses the importance of understanding one’s own motives for becoming a counsellor and monitoring them. Personal therapy contributes to a counsellor’s own growth and self-understanding which is an important aspect when assisting clients. For instance, issues that a client may raise may stir up helper personal issues. The therapist needs to be able to bracket uncomfortable reactions and attend to the client’s issues in order to promote constructive therapeutic interactions. Furthermore, counsellor and client variables should be considered, these include personalities, belief systems and demographics that could affect the helping relationship. Sometimes people get along, and other times it is a mismatch. As a therapist, it is crucial to understanding your own biases, assumptions and worldview to be open to the norms, values and cultural heritage of helpees (Sue & Sue, 2007).

Therapist’s Intentions

A helper’s intentions are based on everything s/he knows about the client at a particular moment. These motives are not always apparent to the counsellor or client at the time because they discover different layers of feelings, thoughts and emotions as they go on (Hill, 2014).  Cozolino (2004) stresses the importance of focusing on exploring the client’s experiences in the moment. If the counsellor is not with the client moment-by-moment, s/he won’t be able to formulate intentions based on the current situation (Hill, 2014). Therapists should be present to assess the client’s information and decide on specific skills.

Counsellor Skills

Clients react by reevaluating their needs, goals and decisions based on the counsellor’s intervention. Brew and Kottler (2016) are of the opinion that clients believe counsellors have the power to assist them but first, it is important to gain confidence in their counselling skills. That being said, Cozolino ( 2004) highlights the importance of being good enough as a therapist. He states that even though environments are not perfect, it could still be adequate when there exists a good therapeutic relationship. The information gained from the client should be based on the therapist’s skills.  These skills include reflecting on feelings, facilitating self-disclosure and asking open-ended questions. A professional attitude and having the right manner when probing is also conducive to the intervention process (Hill, 2014).

In Conclusion

Self-understanding contributes to a counsellor’s ability to listen to the thoughts and feelings of their clients in a nonjudgmental way (Rogers, 1961).  A professional therapeutic relationship is all about listening empathically and supporting clients through difficult times.  Counsellors facilitate a different perspective on problems and assist clients to take action to improve their lives (Hill, 2014). In order to help clients make sense of ambiguity and confusing stimuli, therapists assist in defining goals. Helpers further assess and reevaluate the client’s goals as a reaction to interventions. The helping relationship is thus an interaction between the helper’s intentions and the client’s reactions. A counsellor’s own awareness guides the selection of effective interventions. By paying attention to the client’s feelings the therapist can develop an appropriate treatment plan.

Need to know more?  Call us +(64) 9 888 0779  or complete the contact form.

Contact us today

References

Brew, L. & Kottler, J.A. (2016). Applied Helping Skills: Transforming Lives (2nd ed). Los Angeles: Sage.
Cozolino, L. (2004). The making of a therapist. New York, USA: W.W. Norton & Company.
Hill, C. E. (2014). Helping skills: Facilitating exploration, insight, and action (4th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
Sue, D. W., & Sue, D. (2003). Counseling the culturally diverse: Theory and practice (4th ed.). New York: Wiley.
Rogers, C. (1961). On becoming a person. London, United Kingdom: Constable Publishers. Available online library (2004 ed)

16 Apr 2018

BY: Anna Keyter

Assessment / Couple Counselling / Depression / Online Counselling / Online Counsellor / Online therapist / Online Therapy

Comments: 1 Comment

The Process Model of Helping
Introduction:

The Process Model of Helping (PMH) as introduced by Clara Hill (2014), can be defined as three stages of intervention: Exploration, Insight, and Action.  It incorporates client-centred, psychoanalytic, and cognitive–behavioral approaches. The PMH foundation (exploration stage) is based on the client-centred model due to its facilitative aspects of helping (Hill, 2014). People seek help for various reasons, whether it is problems with peers or living with parents. The goal to find therapy is based on difficult situations (Carkhuff, 1987), by addressing sensitive issues clients can understand themselves in new ways.

When the self-concept and ideal-self are similar (congruent) self-actualisation (optimal-self) can be achieved (Chodorkoff, 1954). Through a supportive relationship, the congruent and incongruent perception of the self that stems from interactions with others (previous experiences) can be addressed. People have an innate need for self-actualisation which refers to the need to reach their full potential (Rogers, 1959). Hill (2014) highlights the facilitative and healing aspects of helping in terms of using skills (natural ability and learning), creating facilitative conditions (empathy, warmth and congruence) and self-awareness (knowledge and insight).

Stage 1 | The Exploration Stage

Maslow (1968) was the first to use the term ‘self-actualisation’ when it came to a person’s ability to become what he or she is capable of becoming. According to Hill (2014), the exploration phase is based on the client-centred model, hence the focus is on attending, observing, listening and exploring thoughts and feelings. Rogers (1961) suggested that it was important to focus on building nonjudgmental therapeutic relationships, listening to the clients’ narratives and assisting them to experience feelings. The helper would display skills by observing non-verbal and minimal verbal behaviours, exploring by using restatements, asking open questions and considering feelings through reflections, disclosures and open-ended questions (Hill, 2014).

Stage 2 | Insight Stage

Summarising from Hill (2014), in some instances, stage one may be all a helpee needs to make important changes. However, in other situations, the exploration stage is the foundation on which to build the insight stage. Insights draw on the psychodynamic and attachment models. Psychodynamic theories do not focus on behavioural change, but look deeply into troubling issues such as early relationships, the importance of early childhood experiences and place emphasis on defence mechanisms. During the insights stage, the goals are to foster awareness (challenge), facilitate insights (probe, interpret, disclose insights), and working on the therapeutic relationship (immediacy). This stage set the foundation for the action stage where Hill departs from psychodynamic models and applies behavioural theories.

Stage 3 | Action Stage

According to Hill (2014), the action stage is the practical section of the PMH. There are two reasons action is needed, firstly people seek assistance to feel better or change behaviours. The second, to consolidate new thinking patterns into existing schemas and to ensure old habits do not resurface. This part of the intervention still has a client-centered underpinning, and the helper remains a supporter and coach and does not give advice. Hill (2014) draws on Behavioural and Cognitive theories including learning and treatment strategies. The Goals of the Action stage is to explore new behaviours, deciding on and developing new skills, assisting clients to evaluate and modify action plans and processing feelings about change. Types of action include relaxation for behaviour change, rehearsal, and decision making. Helper skills are displayed through open action questions, providing information and feedback to clients, advising on the process, directing guidance and disclosing strategies.

Conclusion

Hill’s (2014) aim was to provide a helping model, integrating affect cognition and behaviour as a framework for exploring helpee concerns, gaining insight into their issues and enabling them to make desired changes. The Three-Stage Model is based on an eclectic perspective (integrating diverse philosophies), that is grounding practice and theory on the philosophies of Rogers, Erikson, Maheler, Skinner and Ellis & Beck.

Need to know more?  Call us +(64) 9 888 0779  or complete the contact form.

Contact us today

References

Castonguay, L.G. & Hill, C. (2017). How and why are some therapists better than others?: Understanding therapist effects. Washington: American Psychological Association. 

Corey, M. S. & Corey, G. (2006). Groups: Process and practice (7th ed.). Belmont, CA: Thompson Higher Education.

Cozolino, L. (2004). The making of a therapist. New York, USA: W.W. Norton & Company.

Hill, C. E. (2009). Helping skills: Facilitating exploration, insight, and action (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Hill, C. E. (2014). Helping skills: Facilitating exploration, insight, and action (4th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Rogers, C.R. (1959). A theory of therapy, personality and interpersonal relationships, as developed in the client-centered framework. In S. Koch (ed.). Psychology: A study of science. (pp. 84-256). N.Y.: McGraw Hill.

Rogers, C. (1961). On becoming a person. London, United Kingdom: Constable Publishers. Available online library (2004 ed)

 

Side bar